Fishing

Fishing

Photo: Captain Paul Eidman,
Reel Therapy

Improvements in water quality have brought the return of many species of fish to the Lower Raritan. The nontidal portions of the river have largemouth and smallmouth bass, carp, yellow perch, sunfish, catfish and American eel, and the river is trout stocked in the spring between the North Branch/South Branch confluence and Route 206 (see www.njfishandwildlife.com). Lower portions of the river host migratory salt water fish including striped bass, weakfish and fluke. A shad fishery is developing in the Raritan, fostered by dam removals and installation of a fish ladder at the confluence of the Millstone River.

Can I eat fish from the Raritan?

Fish Smart Eat Smart NJ

Because of historic contamination in coastal and inland waters around the state, the NJ Department of Environmental Protection operates a Fish Smart Eat Smart NJ Program that advises on the suitability of eating the various species of fish and crustaceans caught in New Jersey waters, both fresh and marine. To learn more about safe consumption of fish from the Lower Raritan and Raritan Bay, consult the 2012 Fish Consumption Advisory Report at www.state.nj.us/dep/dsr/2012-advisory-report.pdf and brochure www.state.nj.us/dep/dsr/english-brochure.pdf, or contact the NJDEP Office of Science at 609-984-6070.

Fishing

Photo: Captain Paul Eidman, Reel Therapy

A fishing license is required to fish in New Jersey. Learn more about how and where to obtain a license at http://njfishandwildlife.com/fishneed.htm (NJ Division of Fish & Wildlife).

Fishing

Photo: Captain Paul Eidman,
Reel Therapy

A number of charter businesses offer sport fishing and ecotour trips in the Bay and estuary. Popular public fishing spots along the river include Donaldson Park (Highland Park), Johnson Park (Piscataway), Boyd Park (New Brunswick), the Edison Boat Basin, Bound Brook at the Queens Bridge, Robert Street launch area (Raritan Borough) and Duke Island Park/Headgates Dam.